COLUMBARIUM

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Columbarium – south side of Mt. Calvary

Many people are opting for cremation today because of various reasons. As we well know, scattering of ashes or keeping ashes at home are not options. Reverent disposition of the ashes of a loved one is the only option. In order to meet the needs of our parishioners, St. Michael Parish has chosen to place a Columbarium, with 60 (12″ x 12″ x 12″) inches, in the cemetery with the option for another in the future. Entombment of cremains in a Columbarium has become a common practice as it allows for a permanent memorial for a loved one. St. Michael has chosen to offer this type of burial option in order to better serve our parishioners.

Brochures are available in the “Rack” in the Gathering Space or you may call the Parish Office at 322-4505 and speak with Michaeline at ext. 220 or Janice at ext. 241 for more information and for purchase of the Niches.

In case you are not familiar with a Columbarium:

A Columbarium is a structure of vaults lined with recesses for urns containing cremains with the origin from the Latin word columba, meaning dove.

A Niche is a recess in a wall for cremains which has a marble piece for the closure.

Cremation is to reduce to ashes by burning (such as a dead body). Cremains are the ashes of a cremated body.

An Urn is a vessel made of varying types of materials such as metal, marble, or ceramic, in which remains of an individual are placed.

The definite preference of the Church is for burial of the body after death. However since 1963 cremation has been permitted, although the cremated remains were not allowed to be present during the funeral mass. In 1997 the Vatican gave the bishops of the US permission to allow the celebration of the funeral mass with the cremated remains present, provided the local bishop permitted it. The Church strongly prefers that cremation take place after the full funeral liturgy with the body, as the presence of the body most clearly brings to mind the life and death of the person and better expresses the values that the Church affirms in its rite.

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